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FILM :
JACK REACHER
Mutual Film Company, Paramount Pictures, Skydance Productions' Action, Crime, Drama directed by Christopher McQuarrie starring Tom Cruise "Jack Reacher", Robert Duvall "Cash", David Oyelowo "Detective Emerson", Werner Herzog "The Zec", Alexia Fast "Sandy", Rosamund Pike "Helen Rodin", Richard Jenkins "D.A. Rodin", Joseph Sikora "Barr". Screenwriter: Christopher McQuarrie. Based on the book "One Shot" written by: Lee Child. Producers: Don Granger, Tom Cruise, Dana Goldberg, Gary Levinsohn, Kevin J. Messick, Paula Wagner. Executive Producer: David Ellison. Director of Photography: Caleb Deschanel, ASC . Production Designer: Jim Bissell. Costume Designer: Susan Matheson. Editors: Stephen M. Rickert Jr., Kevin Stitt. Art Directors: Christa Munro, Gregory A. Weimerskirch. Set Decorator: Douglas A. Mowat. Composer: Joe Kramer. RELEASE DATES: 26 DECEMBER 2012 (FRANCE) / 21 DECEMBER 2012 (USA)
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ROSAMUND PIKE IS HELEN RODIN IN JACK REACHER: When Rosamund Pike was offered the chance to star alongside Tom Cruise in Jack Reacher she immediately said "yes" and turned to the source material - Lee Child's best selling novels featuring the former military cop with a burning desire to deliver justice. She was instantly hooked. "I hadn't read any of Lee's books before but I certainly got into them very quickly - in fact my whole family got into them because they are so wonderfully addictive. I started with the first book, Killing Floor, which is a great story," she says. "And then I read the book, One Shot, that our film is based on. And then I read several more. I'm a huge fan. The stories are fantastically gripping and you really can't put them down." Child creates brilliantly well rounded female characters, she notes, and her role in Jack Reacher, as Helen Rodin was an amalgam of three women who feature in the book - a conceit devised by Christopher McQuarrie who adapted the novel into a screenplay and directed the film. "I really like the way that Lee writes about women. There were three female characters in One Shot and Chris has merged them all into one, which was great for me." "And actually, Lee Child is so confident and so on top of his game that he said, 'that was a great idea Chris, I probably should have done that...' He is very laid back." McQuarrie's film, a gripping noir thriller that introduces cinema audiences to a classic anti-hero in Jack Reacher (Cruise), a loner who drifts from one town to the next, pays homage to American film's golden age, the 1970s, she says. "I saw the film two weeks ago and I came out on a real high, I thought, 'this is a really cool film...' "I have so much respect for Christopher McQuarrie, who has made a film that has all the beauty and class of a 1970s thriller and yet also has a kind of subversive cool in its humour and originally conceived violence. You get a sinister impression of being in a world of very, very violent ruthless people." The story opens with a gripping sequence when five innocent people are shot dead by an expert sniper. It seems to be an open and shut case of random, senseless violence and the police immediately arrest a former Iraq veteran, James Barr, and charge him with the multiple murders. The evidence is stacked up against Barr and even his lawyer, Helen Rodin - played by Ms Pike - is convinced that he is guilty but she also firmly believes that he has the right to a fair trial. When Jack Reacher arrives in town he too, is convinced that Barr, a man he knew back from when they were both in the military, is guilty. But then Barr, who has been badly beaten, calls for Reacher's help and he reluctantly agrees to join Ms Rodin's investigation into the killings. And Reacher discovers that Barr might well have been set up and that a much more sinister criminal conspiracy is in play. "Helen is a lawyer who believes in justice which means that sometimes you have to defend people who have done wrong. She truly believes that everyone deserves a fair trial , so she picks up the case of defending this guy who has been accused of a senseless public shooting and looks stonewall guilty. "The whole town wants this guy to get the death penalty but she thinks, and believes, that even if he is guilty, he deserves a fair trail no matter what and that's when she recruits Reacher to help investigate the crime." Working with Cruise, one of the biggest film stars in the world, was, says Ms Pike, an absolute delight. The star was open, collaborative and friendly, she says. "Tom is very, very present. He looks you in the eye and he's really interested in you. He's focused, supportive, and funny - if you ask a direct question and you get a direct answer. "He's not cagey or mysterious at all. He's a totally straight up man. I loved him. I felt completely comfortable. He's a pro, he's very funny and he's easy to work with because he loves acting and he hasn't become jaded by the business at all. "You wonder with somebody who has been in the business for a few years that maybe they might just perform for the camera, switch it off again and get on their Blackberry. You know, just produce the goods when needed. "But Tom is not like that at all, he is so present and he was as invested in my close ups as he was his own, which I have to say is rare." She was hugely impressed too, that Cruise performed all of his own stunts, including one stunning car chase sequence through the streets of Pittsburgh, where Jack Reacher was filmed. "The thing is Tom is such a consummate stunt man, as well as being a great actor and you don't need any tricks because the camera can just sit back and watch the action in a cool nonchalant way. There is no trickery because it is the actor actually doing the stunts, which is fantastic. "I'd get up in the middle of the night just to go and watch him do these fantastic stunt sequences in the cars. Everyone was just so excited by it," she says. "Tom was driving this amazing car, the Chevrolet Chevelle, which just growls as it goes along and to see Tom driving it at 60mph around a corner skidding past three police cars, bouncing off another and going through a tunnel the wrong way with traffic coming towards him, was extraordinary. I'll never forget it. "You look at those stunts and I don't think there is another actor who can honestly say he does his own driving. I can only think of Steve McQueen from the past. There is no stunt double in anything - it's all Tom." She also cherished the chance to work alongside two elder statesmen of contemporary cinema, Werner Herzog - best known as a director - and screen legend Robert Duvall. Herzog plays the mysterious criminal mastermind known as The Zec and Duvall plays Cash, a military vet who runs a shooting range and rides to Reacher's aid at a crucial time. "I think Werner and Robert elevate the film. Isn't Robert Duvall sublime? He's (Word omitted) so wonderful. I'm really pleased with my performance in the film but I do think, 'if I could just be as good as that...' I just think if you can do that much with that little and be that good, I really think it's sublime. "Robert is so casual and centered and cool. He carries his life right on to the screen and it's wonderful. I hope our generation will produce actors of that calibre. This film is brilliantly cast because you have Tom, who is just great and makes this role his own, and then you have Robert and Werner too. "And I think Werner is really unexpected and villainous in a completely quiet way - he plays this man who has seen evil in his life and evil is kind of blank. It doesn't even try, there's no reason to it. And it's all the more scary. Both Werner and Robert were wonderful to work with, in fact they all were. We had a really good time doing this picture." Ms Pike has emerged as one of the most sought after British actresses working today. In recent years, she's starred in films as diverse as An Education and Made In Dagenham - both relatively small budget but highly acclaimed British productions - and Hollywood projects including Barney's Version, The Big Year, a comedy in which she starred opposite Owen Wilson, Jack Black and Steve Martin, and the blockbuster Clash of the Titans 2, playing the warrior Princess Andromeda opposite Sam Worthington. Variety, she says, is essential and she's determined not to be typecast. "You never want people to think that they've got a hold on you," she smiles. Ms Pike was born and raised in London and studied English literature at Oxford. After graduation she starred in several British TV productions, including Love in a Cold Climate and Wives and Daughters. Her big screen break came playing Miranda Frost in Die Another Day in 2002. Her numerous other credits include The Libertine, Pride and Prejudice, Fracture and Fugitive Pieces. Q and A follows: Q: Are you pleased with the finished film? A: Yes, I am. I saw the film two weeks ago and I came out on a real high, I thought, 'this is a really cool film...' and it's achieved what we all wanted. I have so much respect for Christopher McQuarrie who has made a film that has all the beauty and class of a 1970s thriller and yet also has the kind of subversive cool with the humour and quite original violence. Not that much violence is explicit and yet you get the impression that these are very, very violent people who are ruthless and cold. I think the way that Chris shot the opening sequence of the killings is very shocking and it needs to be. And the fight sequences, Paul Jennings, the stunt coordinator who is a friend of mine, work really well, too. They're so good. And the thing is Tom is such a consummate stunt man, as well as being a great actor and you don't need any tricks because the camera can just sit back and watch the action in a cool nonchalant way, almost, because you are not trying to cheat because it is the actor actually doing the stunts, which is fantastic. Q: It gets harder for directors to make the action scenes look exciting, to give us something we haven't seen before... A: Yes, it is but I think they've done that with this film. One of my favourites is a scene when the two thugs come and attack Reacher when he is in the bathtub and you think 'well, there's no way he can get out of that..' And they don't try and find some clever way to get him out; it's all down to how the two thugs mess it up. And what Reacher can do is turn a situation into his advantage. He's such a cool character because he is one step ahead and he is thinking about everything that might happen. And he's a brilliant reader of people and that's what makes him such a good investigator. Q: Had you read any of the Jack Reacher novels before the film came to you? A: No, I hadn't read any of Lee's books before but I certainly got into them very quickly - in fact my whole family got into them because they are so wonderfully addictive. I started with the first book, Killing Floor, which is a great story and I thought Roscoe (a female cop in the story) would be a great character when the come to film that story. I would imagine it would be a very good film if they do that one. So I started with the first one and then read the book, One Shot, which our film is based on. And then I read several more. I'm a huge fan. Q: What did you like about the books? A: Well obviously the stories are fantastically gripping. You really can't put them down. I really like the way that Lee writes about women. There were three female characters in One Shot and Chris has merged them all into one, which was great for me. And actually, Lee Child is so confident and so on top of his game that he said, 'that was a great idea Chris, I probably should have done that...' He is very laid back Q: So you met Lee Child? A: Oh yes, he's in the film - he plays a desk sergeant at the police station and we talk about what cops do and don't do, and that's Lee Child. So that was great. Q: What was he like? A: He's great. He's just incredibly laid back and very easy-come, easy go. I think he's very excited that his book has been made into a film but he probably knew that somebody would make it into a film, whether it was us or some other filmmakers. I think it amused him really and he was interested to see how it all works. I think Lee is having a good life and who wouldn't be? He has created this wonderful character, Reacher, who comes across as cool and I think the more you discover about him the more you want to know and the more you care about him. There is still so much for an audience there and if they do more films there's so much to explore with the character. Q: As always with books that are so well loved there's always a lot of anticipation and speculation about who plays who especially with Tom Cruise as Reacher. Do you think he has made the character his own? A: Oh most definitely. And there was never any doubt in my mind that Tom would convince everybody that he is perfect to play Jack Reacher - I never worried about that for a second. It just became an interesting talking point. And in a way, it's quite cool because Tom is so on top of everything so he had something to battle against and that's quite good. And Tom is great as Reacher that the fact that he's not blond or seven foot tall or has huge hands just doesn't come into it. Tom is Reacher and you see this performance and he just blows you away. Q: It's a very physical role for Tom but as you said he revels in the action and has done it so well in the past.. A: Yes, you look at those stunts and I don't think there is another actor who could do his own driving. I can only think of Steve McQueen from the past. There is no stunt double in anything - it's all Tom. And that's why the stunt coordinator could just sort of sit back and almost observe because it's all Tom. Chris didn't have to cut away from the shot. So often you have to cut away from the shot because it's a stunt double and then you have a close up to remind the audience who the actor is. But not with Tom - it's all him. Q: Did you see him doing the stunts? A: Oh yes (laughs). I'd get up in the middle of the night just to go and watch him do these fantastic stunt sequences in the cars. Everyone was just so excited by it. He was driving this amazing car, the Chevrolet Chevelle, which just growls as it goes along and to see Tom driving it at 60mph around a corner skidding past three police cars, bouncing off another and going through a tunnel the wrong way with traffic coming towards him, was extraordinary. I'll never forget it. Q: What's he like to work with? A: Tom is very, very present. He looks you in the eye and he's really interested in you. He's focused, supportive, funny, ask a direct question and you get a direct answer. He's not cagey or mysterious at all. He's a totally straight up man. I loved him. I felt completely comfortable. He's a pro, he's very funny and he's easy to work with because he loves acting and he hasn't become jaded by the business at all. You wonder with somebody who has been in the business for a few years maybe they might just perform for the camera, switch it off again and get on their Blackberry. You know, just produce the goods when needed. But Tom is not like that at all, he is so present and he was as invested in my close ups as he was his own, which I have to say is rare. Q: You have great chemistry on screen. Do you know that's going to happen before the cameras start rolling or is it only when you're filming that the spark happens? A: It felt great working with Tom. And it's surprising because you never really know.But apparently right from when we did the first camera tests together, when we were trying out wardrobe and lighting techniques, they felt that there was this chemistry there then. And it's funny what the camera picks up on. You can get on with some other actors but it's just not there on screen. But this time it was just there from the start. And that's great because we needed it to be there for the film. Q: Do you like playing Americans? Is the accent easy for you? A: I'm getting better. I feel like this was the film where it really worked. When I was speaking in the film, I was like, 'cool, my work has paid off.' And I did work really work very hard and it sounds really good, I think. I worked as hard as I would on another language, it's not just winging it. It's all about learning the proper sounds, the way you would if you were learning, say, French. You change the way your mouth moves, the muscles, the tongue, everything. And that was the first film in which I felt fluent in American. I've done American accents in other films but with this one I felt I could be as free as I am when I'm speaking with an English accent. And it was very exciting. Q: Did you get out while you were in Pittsburgh? A: Oh absolutely. We were in Pittsburgh so we were going to the Steelers games, we were going to the Penguins, we were immersed in the local scene and that was a big help and I really enjoyed it there. It's a very lovely city. Q: Did you look at any other films for inspiration for this one? A: Well, we did looked at lots of relationships between men and women, like Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant in Notorious and Robert Redford and Faye Dunaway in Three Days of the Condor. And we watched things like His Girl Friday to get that quick dialogue - even though it's a very different atmosphere to our film, you're trying to get that snappy repartee. And it's much harder than you think. And we also looked at (Humphrey) Bogart and (Lauren) Bacall in Key Largo. Q: How would you describe your character? She's got this conflict with her father which has forced her out on a limb and that gives you some very interesting stuff to play doesn't it? A: Yes, she has and I think that you get the sense that she hasn't had it that easy. And she's doing a very unpalatable job - she's a lawyer who believes in justice and that means that sometimes you have to defend people who have done wrong. But she truly believes in the justice system and that everyone deserves a fair trial and then she picks up the case of defending this guy who has been accused of shooting these people and he looks stonewall guilty. The whole town wants this guy to get the death penalty and she thinks, and believes, that even if he is guilty, he deserves a fair trail no matter what and that's when she recruits Reacher to help investigate the crime. But really, she's out on her own, she doesn't work for a particularly high flying office, she hasn't got any money to pay investigators, she is up against a water-tight case and she is trying to prove something to her father. I think she's a fighter. But maybe she's not as tough as she would like to be because when she's confronted by Reacher's kind of off the wall theories she's completely torn. He's there presenting this theory that this guy might be innocent but it's just this theory and even though it does make total sense, she hasn't got any evidence and that's her moment of cowardice and she says, 'I can't do it..' But then she comes through and she fights again. I feel there's something quite lonely about her, which I'm really pleased has come through. People have said to me, 'oh she's a strong, sexy woman...' well, yes, in a way but I think there's a slight undertone of something sad about her. It's just there, it's just part of the mix. But you also feel, by the end of the film, that there's light at the end of the tunnel and you don't feel despairing, you feel hope for her. I loved playing her because there was so much there. Q: Werner Herzog is a really great bad guy. And he has that marvellous voice. What was it like working with him? A: (laughs). It was amazing because we all started to do Werner's voice. We'd be in a restaurant and we'd start saying Werner's lines in the film where he talks about a knife. And actually, Chris is a brilliant mimic and he does a brilliant Werner impression. It was amazing to see Werner strolling around somebody else's set looking rather relaxed because he didn't have the worry of directing. He was probably rather pleased not to be in control for a change. It's interesting, in Werner's documentary, On Death Row, he interviews the victims' families, which is what my character does in our film. Q: Having Werner Herzog and Robert Duvall in the same film is quite a coup... A: Yes it is and I think Werner and Robert elevate the film. Isn't Robert Duvall sublime? He's just so wonderful. I'm really pleased with my performance in the film but I do think, 'if I could just be as good as that...' I just think if you can do that much with that little and be that good, I really think it's sublime. It's so casual and centered and cool. He carries his life right on to the screen and it's wonderful. I hope our generation will produce actors of that calibre. This film is brilliantly cast because you have Tom, who is just great and makes this role his own, and then you have Robert and Werner too. And I think Werner is really unexpected and villainous in a completely quiet way - he plays this man who has seen evil in his life and evil is kind of blank. It doesn't even try, there's no reason to it. And it's all the more scary. Both Werner and Robert were wonderful to work with, in fact they all were. We had a really good time doing this picture. © 2012 PARAMOUNT PICTURES. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
TRAILER A (VOSTFR)
© 2012 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.
™ and © 2012 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.
JACK REACHER Mutual Film Company, Paramount Pictures, Skydance Productions' Action, Crime, Drama directed by Christopher McQuarrie.
ABOUT THE CAST: DAVID OYELOWO [Pronounced – “oh-yellow-oh”] (Detective Emerson) graduated from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA), having received the Scholarship for Excellence from Nicholas Hytner in 1998. Oyelowo has been seen in a variety of compelling projects, from indie films to big studio blockbusters, including; the George Lucas-produced bio-pic “Red Tails,” which told the story of the heroic Tuskegee Airmen who fought in WWII; the summer blockbuster “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” alongside James Franco and Frieda Pinto; the critical and popular hit “The Help.” He was also completed filming on Lee Daniels’ “The Paperboy,” opposite Nicole Kidman and Matthew McConaughey; and Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” with Daniel Day-Lewis and Tommy Lee Jones. Additionally, David was also seen starring in “96 Minutes,” which premiered at the 2011 SXSW Film Festival; Simon Brand’s thriller “Default”; and Ava Duvernay’s “The Middle of Nowhere.” Oyelowo first impressed audiences in “The Suppliants,” at the Gate Theatre, playing King Palasgus, for which he received the Ian Charleson award commendation. Following this he played the title role of “Henry VI,” becoming the first black actor to play an English king for the RSC (Royal Shakespeare Company). The role won him the Ian Charleson Award and an Evening Standard Award nomination. Other theatre credits include an acclaimed performance in Richard Bean’s “The God Brothers” at the Bush Theatre and the title role in Aeschylus’ “Prometheus Bound,” which was off-Broadway and for which David received rave reviews. Beyond theatre, David starred in the BAFTA award-winning series “Spooks” (airing as “MI:5” on BBC America), playing Danny Hunter. Additionally, he won the Royal Television Society Award for Best Actor and was also nominated for a BAFTA for the same role for his work on “Small Island.” David also starred in the BBC1 original television movie “Born Equal,” opposite Colin Firth, as well as ABC’s 2008 production of “A Raisin in the Sun,” alongside Sanaa Lathan and Sean Puffy Combs. David made his U.S. debut in two HBO productions: the Kenneth Branaugh-directed “As You Like It,” opposite Bryce Dallas Howard; and in the mini-series “Five Days,” for which he won the Satellite Award for Best Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television. In 2008, David starred in the acclaimed adaptation of the Alexander McCall Smith novel “The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency,” directed by the late Anthony Minghella. He was also seen on the big screen in Kevin MacDonald’s “The Last King of Scotland”; “Who Do You Love”; “A Sound of Thunder”; “Derailed”; and “The Best Man”. His most challenging screen role to date was in the acclaimed BBC2 film “Shoot the Messenger,” which earned him a Best Actor nomination at the 2006 TriBeCa Film Festival. A leading man since the 1960s, ROBERT DUVALL (Cash) has specialized in taciturn cowboys, fierce leaders and driven characters of all types. Respected by his peers and adored by audiences worldwide, he has earned numerous Oscar® nominations for his performances in “The Godfather,” “Apocalypse Now,” “The Great Santini” and “The Apostle.” Duvall won the Academy Award® as Best Actor for his role in “Tender Mercies,” and later earned the Golden Globe for his performance in the title role of HBO’s “Stalin.” More recently, Duvall was honored with the Golden Globe and Emmy Award for his iconic portrayal of Prentice Ritter in AMC’s “Broken Trail.” Duvall made his big screen debut in 1962, as the creepy Boo Radley in “To Kill a Mockingbird.” He has gone on to star in such films as “Bullitt,” “True Grit,” “M*A*S*H,” “The Conversation,” “Network,” “The Natural,” “Colors,” “Days Of Thunder,” “A Handmaid’s Tale,” “Rambling Rose,” “Wrestling Ernest Hemingway,” “Phenomenon,” “A Civil Action,” “Open Range,” “Thank You For Smoking,” “The Road,” “Get Low” and “Crazy Heart,” among many others. As a director and producer, Duvall got behind the camera for his labor of love project “The Apostle,” in which he also starred. The film went on to earn many accolades, including being named on over 75 film critics “Top 10 Films for 1997” lists, including The New York Times and Los Angeles Times. He also wrote, produced and starred in “Assassination Tango.” Duvall was most recently seen as Johnny Crawford in “Seven Days in Utopia.”
David Oyelowo is Detective Emerson in JACK REACHER, from Paramount Pictures and Skydance Productions.
TRAILER F (VOSTFR)
FEATURETTE #1 "Lee Child" (VOSTFR)
FILM CLIP #1 "Jack Reacher Is Here" (VOSTFR)
TRAILER #1 (VO)
TRAILER #2 (VO)
FEATURETTE #2 "Chevelle" (VOSTFR)
FILM CLIP #1 "You Could Start Running" (VO)
FILM CLIP #2 "What Does An Army Cop Do?" (VO)
FILM CLIP #3 "You´re Working For Me" (VO)
SELECT B-ROLL Part #1 (VO)
SELECT B-ROLL Part #2 (VO)
SOUND BITES #1 Richard Jenkins (VO)
SOUND BITES #2 Tom Cruise Part #1 (VO)
SOUND BITES #3 Tom Cruise Part #2 (VO)
SOUND BITES #4 Rosamund Pike (VO)
SOUND BITES #5 Werner Herzog (VO)
SOUND BITES #6 David Oyelowo Part #1 (VO)
SOUND BITES #7 David Oyelowo Part #2 (VO)
SOUND BITES #8 Robert Duvall (VO)
SOUND BITES #9 Lee Child (VO)
SOUND BITES #10 Christopher McQuarrie Part #1 (VO)
SOUND BITES #11 Christopher McQuarrie Part #2 (VO)
TV SPOT #1 "Ruthless" (VO)
TV SPOT #2 "Guns" (VO)
TV SPOT #3 "Hero" (VO)
TV SPOT #4 "Brilliant" (VO)
UK PREMIERE #1 B-Roll (VO)
UK PREMIERE #2 Christopher McQuarrie (Director) (VO)
UK PREMIERE #3 David Oyelowo "Emerson" (VO)
UK PREMIERE #4 Lee Child (Author) (VO)
UK PREMIERE #5 Robert Duvall "Cash" (VO)
UK PREMIERE #6 Rosamund Pike "Helen" (VO)
UK PREMIERE #7 Tom Cruise "Jack Reacher" (VO)
FILM CLIP #2 "Five Against One" (VOSTFR)
UK PREMIERE Newswrap (VOSTFR)
JACK REACHER'S RULE N°5 (VOSTFR)
JACK REACHER'S RULE N°14 (VOSTFR)
INTERVIEWS #1 Christopher McQuarrie Part #1 (VO)
INTERVIEWS #2 Christopher McQuarrie Part #2 (VO)
INTERVIEWS #3 David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike Part #1 (VO)
INTERVIEWS #4 David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike Part #2 (VO)
FILM CLIP #3 "Eluding Police" (VOSTFR)
FILM CLIP #4 "I'm Not A Hero" (VOSTFR)